Posts predicting the future are a fool’s errand. Looking at predictions from the 20th Century of how life will be in the 21st are comical at best, if not outright bizarre.

But, to boldly go where no man has gone before. We’re going to stick our necks out and give this a go. We’re scaling it in a bit, we’re just looking at five years in the future. But still, here are our predictions on how your kitchen will look and feel in 2020.

Space

As in the space around us, not the space up there. The UN estimates that 74% of the world’s population will live in cities by the year 2050. This means that there will be a lot of people living on top of each other. Space is going to become a keen issue. Electrolux have released a prototype of what a worktop might look like in five years’ time. Aesthetically it isn’t too different from the quartz and granite worktops we supply today. It’s all sleek blacks and clean lines but it’s when you lift up the hood you start to see a different beast entirely.

Named ‘Heart of the Home’ the technology is basically all things at once. In turn a breakfast bar, a stovetop and features a smart touchscreen for picking recipes. The concept revolves around placing your ingredients on the surface, these are analysed and in turn recipes are suggested using these ingredients. With a press of the hand a well is made inside which these foodstuffs can be cooked.

Watch this video for more details:

Eco-friendly

It has recently been reported that the world has passed a carbon dioxide threshold that few scientists believe we will easily come back from. This is bad news, and while it’s hard to fully wrap your head round exactly what this means, on a smaller scale it is likely that the architect or designer of five years’ time will push to make the home eco-friendlier. This change will hit the kitchen in many ways.

First and foremost, in how you process your rubbish. The EU had demanded of the UK that 50% of its rubbish be recycled by the year 2020. Brexit may affect this, but it seems an unlikely path for the UK to take to renounce these targets in the wake of the first-of-its-kind Paris Agreement. It can be tricky tracing a line down from something as macro as the climate accord to something as micro as household recycling, but recycling is, on all key measures, far more efficient than producing from scratch the same material.

To go out on a limb, there is the possibility that homes will start to process their own recycling. We’re at a point today in the UK where homes are encouraged to separate food waste from the general waste. In the near future it is not inconceivable that some of this recycling process will come in house. Many believe the future of renewables is in Anaerobic Digestion, which is the process of creating energy from food and other forms of organic waste. Small plants could be installed in homes, decreasing a home’s reliance on the national grid.

The internet of things

The concept of the internet of things is nothing new. It has been floating around for the last couple of years. It is essentially the idea that all of your appliances will communicate, basically taking you, the human, out of the equation.

In practice what this means currently is that you can monitor the heat and security of your home through a smartphone or tablet when you’re not present. But in the future it will no doubt evolve. An ideal path for this would be, your alarm clock goes off in the morning and informs your coffee machine to create a coffee. You go downstairs to the smell of roasted coffee grinds. Going into the fridge there is fresh milk. You ran out yesterday but your fridge knew, and informed your online shopping account, you got a push notification on your smartphone to approve the purchase. The item was added to your weekly shop, and drone technology left the package for you. Your handy house robot… Too far in five years, but the future of intercommunicating devices is very exciting.

How do you think your future home will look? Let us know in the comments below

Posts predicting the future are a fool’s errand. Looking at predictions from the 20th Century of how life will be in the 21st are comical at best, if not outright bizarre.

But, to boldly go where no man has gone before. We’re going to stick our necks out and give this a go. We’re scaling it in a bit, we’re just looking at five years in the future. But still, here are our predictions on how your kitchen will look and feel in 2020.

Space

As in the space around us, not the space up there. The UN estimates that 74% of the world’s population will live in cities by the year 2050. This means that there will be a lot of people living on top of each other. Space is going to become a keen issue. Electrolux have released a prototype of what a worktop might look like in five years’ time. Aesthetically it isn’t too different from the quartz and granite worktops we supply today. It’s all sleek blacks and clean lines but it’s when you lift up the hood you start to see a different beast entirely.

Named ‘Heart of the Home’ the technology is basically all things at once. In turn a breakfast bar, a stovetop and features a smart touchscreen for picking recipes. The concept revolves around placing your ingredients on the surface, these are analysed and in turn recipes are suggested using these ingredients. With a press of the hand a well is made inside which these foodstuffs can be cooked.

Watch this video for more details:

Eco-friendly

It has recently been reported that the world has passed a carbon dioxide threshold that few scientists believe we will easily come back from. This is bad news, and while it’s hard to fully wrap your head round exactly what this means, on a smaller scale it is likely that the architect or designer of five years’ time will push to make the home eco-friendlier. This change will hit the kitchen in many ways.

First and foremost, in how you process your rubbish. The EU had demanded of the UK that 50% of its rubbish be recycled by the year 2020. Brexit may affect this, but it seems an unlikely path for the UK to take to renounce these targets in the wake of the first-of-its-kind Paris Agreement. It can be tricky tracing a line down from something as macro as the climate accord to something as micro as household recycling, but recycling is, on all key measures, far more efficient than producing from scratch the same material.

To go out on a limb, there is the possibility that homes will start to process their own recycling. We’re at a point today in the UK where homes are encouraged to separate food waste from the general waste. In the near future it is not inconceivable that some of this recycling process will come in house. Many believe the future of renewables is in Anaerobic Digestion, which is the process of creating energy from food and other forms of organic waste. Small plants could be installed in homes, decreasing a home’s reliance on the national grid.

The internet of things

The concept of the internet of things is nothing new. It has been floating around for the last couple of years. It is essentially the idea that all of your appliances will communicate, basically taking you, the human, out of the equation.

In practice what this means currently is that you can monitor the heat and security of your home through a smartphone or tablet when you’re not present. But in the future it will no doubt evolve. An ideal path for this would be, your alarm clock goes off in the morning and informs your coffee machine to create a coffee. You go downstairs to the smell of roasted coffee grinds. Going into the fridge there is fresh milk. You ran out yesterday but your fridge knew, and informed your online shopping account, you got a push notification on your smartphone to approve the purchase. The item was added to your weekly shop, and drone technology left the package for you. Your handy house robot… Too far in five years, but the future of intercommunicating devices is very exciting.

How do you think your future home will look? Let us know in the comments below