The kitchen is becoming the room of the house in which we, as families and friends, spend a lot of time. The stove is the new hearth, and the central island the new coffee table. Both of these kitchen features are used as assembly points, around which bonding, laughter, joy, and no small measure of food and drink are shared.

But whether your kitchen is modern – all clean lines and sharp corners – or more traditional – all hard stone and earthenware cooking pots – the kitchen can be a dangerous place for a child to spend time. In this guide we will not ask you to compromise any of your carefully considered design, or even really change your habits, but through a variety of small changes and clever products we will make sure you can enjoy your kitchen as a family, without having to worry about little heads bumping corners or tiny hands pulling things from the work surface. This eight-point guide will make your stylish kitchen childproof.

First and foremost, be vigilant

There is a whole industry (and corner of the internet) dedicated to trying to tell you that your house is a minefield for little ones. You can easily be swept up into buying this product or that, until your home resembles a fortress. But no measure of purchases will ever keep your little one entirely safe; little fingers will always find their way into forbidden places. The key is vigilance. With a large dose of vigilance you can save yourself a lot of trouble, and money. There really is no substitute, if you don’t think you can keep an eye on your little ones then they really should not be in the kitchen. Move them to a safer space. Or make one in your kitchen…

Create a safe or enclosed space

Larger kitchens these days almost act as two rooms, the industrious workspace, and the more relaxed family area. If you can make a safe and enclosed area in your kitchen for your little one to run wild, then you’re on to a winner. Ensure there is a lot of sensory stimulation in this area for them to play with. This way they won’t look longingly at your work area and want to join in. Dependant on the age of your child, this space will change. A really young child may be content in a bouncer, while an older one may need a bit more space to roam in; perhaps a playpen. There’s no hard and fast rule here, so whatever suits your space and little one.

Magnetic locks

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The cabinets that sit beneath your counter top tend to hold some of the more dangerous things for children to come into contact with. That blender gathering dust, with its razor sharp circular blades; those heavy pots and pans just asking to topple; your cleaning chemicals in a jumble beneath the sink. This is all before we even get on to the very real possibility of having a cabinet full of discarded plastic bags.

The obvious thing to do is to lock these hazards away. And there are hundreds of locks that you could invest in, but many are not as childproofed as you would hope. A more accurate description would be mildly resistant. The one that works every time and will not disrupt the elegant design of your cabinet doors is the Safety 1st Magnetic Lock (buy them on Amazon here). Attached to the inside of your door, these leave the front of your cabinets free from any clutter. The key can be stored in a safe place, away from curious hands. Touch the key in the right place and the door springs open.

Watch out for the overhang

The overhang can materialise in many ways. It can be pots and pans on the hob with their handles protruding over the edge of the counter top. It can also be tea towels set down beneath a hot pan dangling off the edge. It can also be wires from the kettle, toaster or blender, hanging invitingly off the edge. Make sure that these hazards are kept well away from the counter’s edge.

If you’re leaving a pan cooking unattended, it is a good idea to ensure that it sits at the back of the stove with handles turned away from the edge of the countertop. Similarly, with tea towels that have been put down to stop a hot pan burning the wooden countertop, make sure these sit right at the back of the counter. The same applies for any heavy appliances, or anything that contains hot food or liquids.

Invest in induction hobs

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These clever stovetops use electromagnetism to heat the pan, rather than the hob itself. There’s a lot of science behind this, but in practical terms it means that to touch they remain cool, while heating only the pan. When you are finished cooking remove the hot pan and almost instantly the hob returns to a safe temperature. This is ideal for older children who like to clamber up and on the countertop. Each of our showrooms feature a Bosch Appliance Centre. Come in and have a chat with one of our experienced design consultants who will show you your induction hob options.

Cover soft furnishings

If you’ve spent a lot of money on your soft furnishings, the last thing you want is a big splodge of ketchup on your cream cushions. The best way to counteract this is to invest in some washable covers. These can easily be slipped on and whipped off to suit the occasion. Having an adult dinner party? Whip them off and put them in storage. But for teatime the next day slip, them back on and any spilt bolognaise won’t spoil your kitchen chairs or stalls.

Make your kitchen a welcoming space

This is less a tip for safety, but rather a tip on making your kitchen a liveable space. Letting your children grow accustomed to being in and around the kitchen will stand them in good stead for adult life. Ask your children to muck in during the cooking process, this way they will feel comfortable in the kitchen and around food. Lots of little helpers will also lessen the load for you, making your time in the kitchen a more enjoyable one. And as the old saying goes, the devil makes work for idle thumbs. A happy helper is less likely to be pulling and tugging at things they shouldn’t be.

We at Optiplan firmly believe in the power of the kitchen to unite the family. Take a look at our kitchen gallery and get in contact to see how we can help you get the kitchen of your dreams.

The kitchen is becoming the room of the house in which we, as families and friends, spend a lot of time. The stove is the new hearth, and the central island the new coffee table. Both of these kitchen features are used as assembly points, around which bonding, laughter, joy, and no small measure of food and drink are shared.

But whether your kitchen is modern – all clean lines and sharp corners – or more traditional – all hard stone and earthenware cooking pots – the kitchen can be a dangerous place for a child to spend time. In this guide we will not ask you to compromise any of your carefully considered design, or even really change your habits, but through a variety of small changes and clever products we will make sure you can enjoy your kitchen as a family, without having to worry about little heads bumping corners or tiny hands pulling things from the work surface. This eight-point guide will make your stylish kitchen childproof.

First and foremost, be vigilant

There is a whole industry (and corner of the internet) dedicated to trying to tell you that your house is a minefield for little ones. You can easily be swept up into buying this product or that, until your home resembles a fortress. But no measure of purchases will ever keep your little one entirely safe; little fingers will always find their way into forbidden places. The key is vigilance. With a large dose of vigilance you can save yourself a lot of trouble, and money. There really is no substitute, if you don’t think you can keep an eye on your little ones then they really should not be in the kitchen. Move them to a safer space. Or make one in your kitchen…

Create a safe or enclosed space

Larger kitchens these days almost act as two rooms, the industrious workspace, and the more relaxed family area. If you can make a safe and enclosed area in your kitchen for your little one to run wild, then you’re on to a winner. Ensure there is a lot of sensory stimulation in this area for them to play with. This way they won’t look longingly at your work area and want to join in. Dependant on the age of your child, this space will change. A really young child may be content in a bouncer, while an older one may need a bit more space to roam in; perhaps a playpen. There’s no hard and fast rule here, so whatever suits your space and little one.

Magnetic locks

jjjj

The cabinets that sit beneath your counter top tend to hold some of the more dangerous things for children to come into contact with. That blender gathering dust, with its razor sharp circular blades; those heavy pots and pans just asking to topple; your cleaning chemicals in a jumble beneath the sink. This is all before we even get on to the very real possibility of having a cabinet full of discarded plastic bags.

The obvious thing to do is to lock these hazards away. And there are hundreds of locks that you could invest in, but many are not as childproofed as you would hope. A more accurate description would be mildly resistant. The one that works every time and will not disrupt the elegant design of your cabinet doors is the Safety 1st Magnetic Lock (buy them on Amazon here). Attached to the inside of your door, these leave the front of your cabinets free from any clutter. The key can be stored in a safe place, away from curious hands. Touch the key in the right place and the door springs open.

Watch out for the overhang

The overhang can materialise in many ways. It can be pots and pans on the hob with their handles protruding over the edge of the counter top. It can also be tea towels set down beneath a hot pan dangling off the edge. It can also be wires from the kettle, toaster or blender, hanging invitingly off the edge. Make sure that these hazards are kept well away from the counter’s edge.

If you’re leaving a pan cooking unattended, it is a good idea to ensure that it sits at the back of the stove with handles turned away from the edge of the countertop. Similarly, with tea towels that have been put down to stop a hot pan burning the wooden countertop, make sure these sit right at the back of the counter. The same applies for any heavy appliances, or anything that contains hot food or liquids.

Invest in induction hobs

ggggg

These clever stovetops use electromagnetism to heat the pan, rather than the hob itself. There’s a lot of science behind this, but in practical terms it means that to touch they remain cool, while heating only the pan. When you are finished cooking remove the hot pan and almost instantly the hob returns to a safe temperature. This is ideal for older children who like to clamber up and on the countertop. Each of our showrooms feature a Bosch Appliance Centre. Come in and have a chat with one of our experienced design consultants who will show you your induction hob options.

Cover soft furnishings

If you’ve spent a lot of money on your soft furnishings, the last thing you want is a big splodge of ketchup on your cream cushions. The best way to counteract this is to invest in some washable covers. These can easily be slipped on and whipped off to suit the occasion. Having an adult dinner party? Whip them off and put them in storage. But for teatime the next day slip, them back on and any spilt bolognaise won’t spoil your kitchen chairs or stalls.

Make your kitchen a welcoming space

This is less a tip for safety, but rather a tip on making your kitchen a liveable space. Letting your children grow accustomed to being in and around the kitchen will stand them in good stead for adult life. Ask your children to muck in during the cooking process, this way they will feel comfortable in the kitchen and around food. Lots of little helpers will also lessen the load for you, making your time in the kitchen a more enjoyable one. And as the old saying goes, the devil makes work for idle thumbs. A happy helper is less likely to be pulling and tugging at things they shouldn’t be.

We at Optiplan firmly believe in the power of the kitchen to unite the family. Take a look at our kitchen gallery and get in contact to see how we can help you get the kitchen of your dreams.