When renovating or refitting a kitchen it is all about balancing form with function. You, of course, want the most attractive kitchen you can get, but it is also important to think about the space the kitchen will be occupying and in turn who will be using the kitchen.

While every kitchen is unique and special – and none more so than your own – they tend to fall into five categories. Each suits a different type of home and space and comes with its own set of positives and challenges. There is of course always the question about what exactly your kitchen will be used for. Are you a large, busy household or a smaller apartment with a single resident who tends to eat out more often than not? All of these thoughts should run through your mind before you go any way to making a decision about how your kitchen will look.

To help you with this we are going to run through a variety of kitchen templates and offer a suggestion on who this type of kitchen best suits. These opinions are of course not prescriptive; at the end of the day it is your kitchen so style it as you see fit.

Kitchen Type: One wall kitchen

Perfect for:

Smaller houses, individuals living alone or studio apartments

Characteristics:

The one walled kitchen benefits from having everything in fairly close proximity. You will grow accustomed to working across one latitudinal plain, side-stepping your way from sink, to fridge, to cooker. These types of kitchens tend to opt for the cooker and fridge at opposite ends, with the sink and bin stationed in the middle. Worktops can be placed in between, leaving space to work either side of the sink and cooker.

Positives:

  • Extremely space efficient
  • Efficiency of use with just one single working area

Challenges:

  • Surface space can seem limited
  • Fridges and cookers take up a lot of space leaving little space for other white goods 

Kitchen Type: Galley

Perfect for:

Individuals, older couples, younger couples or small families

Characteristics:

The galley kitchen sits flush against two parallel walls. At one end is an entrance, at the other is either a wall, door or opening into another room. It offers double the space afforded the one wall kitchen but takes up twice the amount of space. As such a larger space is required for such a kitchen type. This is the manner in which professional kitchens tend to be laid out. This means they are highly efficient cooking spaces. You will be afforded a good amount of surface area (with lots of space underneath for white goods, such as dishwashers and washing machines). The golden work triangle between cooker, sink and fridge will be compact and complete. 

Positives:

  • Efficient use of space
  • The kitchen can become a walkthrough from a relaxed living area to a more formal dining area
  • The golden work triangle is intact
  • A decent amount of work surface area
  • Lots of of space beneath work surfaces for storage and white goods
  • Light and airy

Challenges:

  • As space may be a touch limited it may be tricky to include a central dining point making it a potentially solitary kitchen
  • If your galley kitchen serves as a walkway between two different spaces it could become a very busy room

Kitchen Type: G-shaped

Perfect for:

Families big and small 

Characteristics:

The G-shaped kitchen takes the basic shape of the U and adds an extra peninsula jutting out into the open floor space. This adds a decent amount of surface top space to be used, this peninsula area can accommodate the cooker top or can alternatively be used as a space to entertain. The peninsula gives the feel of a 360-degree kitchen unit with surfaces and work points surrounding. This layout also adds a natural barrier to the kitchen leaving a busy chef in their element, away from interruptions from curious youngster.

Positives:

  • A modern kitchen layout
  • The peninsula creates a barrier to the kitchen
  • The peninsula is perfect for entertaining and cooking simultaneously
  • Lots of surface space for multiple hands to help

Challenges:

  • The G shape demands a decent amount of space to be practical
  • Not particularly practical for table and chairs

Kitchen Type: L-shaped (can accommodate an island)

Perfect for:

Spacious, open plan houses, families of all sizes, couples, individuals

Characteristics:

This has to be one of the most popular forms of kitchen. The proliferation of kitchens as multi-purpose entertainment, relaxation and cooking spaces has seen this style explode. The kitchen area is essentially tucked into a corner of a larger room. It can easily be adapted with the length of each leg a matter of taste, but more importantly space. An extremely welcoming layout that screams out entertaining, it practically invites guests to roll up their sleeves and muddle in. Dependant on space this layout can easily accommodate a table and chairs to host dinner or seat children while meals are prepared. What you gain in openness you lose in worktop space, with less than in the previous U or G-shaped kitchens.

Positives:

  • Perfect for socialising
  • Comfortably accommodates a table and chairs
  • An extremely popular choice for modern, open plan spaces
  • Can easily be scaled up or down in size
  • Can easily accommodate a central island

Challenges:

  • Larger spaces will see a fairly large distance from one end to the other, potentially extending the golden work triangle
  • Limited surface space
  • Can be tricky to keep curious children out

Kitchen Type: U-shaped (can accommodate an island)

Perfect for:

Couples or smaller families

Characteristics:

This is a fairly common layout for kitchens in flats and apartments across the UK. It uses three walls to form a kitchen that wraps around its inhabitant. It is a good layout for groups of young professionals living together as it allows space for multiple cooks to work all at the same time, it also works well for couples and young or small families. It offers a fair amount of surface space and maintains the golden work triangle allowing for easy access from one point to the next. This kitchen can be scaled up and can easily grow depending on the amount of space available. This kitchen type allows for an island that can either sit in the centre of the U or can be used as the fourth wall to complete the four sided shape.

Positives:

  • Fairly spacious
  • Malleable to the space available
  • Can accommodate an island
  • The golden work triangle stays intact

Challenges:

  • Can be tricky accommodating a table and chairs
  • Space in the corners of the U can feel wasted

When renovating or refitting a kitchen it is all about balancing form with function. You, of course, want the most attractive kitchen you can get, but it is also important to think about the space the kitchen will be occupying and in turn who will be using the kitchen.

While every kitchen is unique and special – and none more so than your own – they tend to fall into five categories. Each suits a different type of home and space and comes with its own set of positives and challenges. There is of course always the question about what exactly your kitchen will be used for. Are you a large, busy household or a smaller apartment with a single resident who tends to eat out more often than not? All of these thoughts should run through your mind before you go any way to making a decision about how your kitchen will look.

To help you with this we are going to run through a variety of kitchen templates and offer a suggestion on who this type of kitchen best suits. These opinions are of course not prescriptive; at the end of the day it is your kitchen so style it as you see fit.

Kitchen Type: One wall kitchen

Perfect for:

Smaller houses, individuals living alone or studio apartments

Characteristics:

The one walled kitchen benefits from having everything in fairly close proximity. You will grow accustomed to working across one latitudinal plain, side-stepping your way from sink, to fridge, to cooker. These types of kitchens tend to opt for the cooker and fridge at opposite ends, with the sink and bin stationed in the middle. Worktops can be placed in between, leaving space to work either side of the sink and cooker.

Positives:

  • Extremely space efficient
  • Efficiency of use with just one single working area

Challenges:

  • Surface space can seem limited
  • Fridges and cookers take up a lot of space leaving little space for other white goods 

Kitchen Type: Galley

Perfect for:

Individuals, older couples, younger couples or small families

Characteristics:

The galley kitchen sits flush against two parallel walls. At one end is an entrance, at the other is either a wall, door or opening into another room. It offers double the space afforded the one wall kitchen but takes up twice the amount of space. As such a larger space is required for such a kitchen type. This is the manner in which professional kitchens tend to be laid out. This means they are highly efficient cooking spaces. You will be afforded a good amount of surface area (with lots of space underneath for white goods, such as dishwashers and washing machines). The golden work triangle between cooker, sink and fridge will be compact and complete. 

Positives:

  • Efficient use of space
  • The kitchen can become a walkthrough from a relaxed living area to a more formal dining area
  • The golden work triangle is intact
  • A decent amount of work surface area
  • Lots of of space beneath work surfaces for storage and white goods
  • Light and airy

Challenges:

  • As space may be a touch limited it may be tricky to include a central dining point making it a potentially solitary kitchen
  • If your galley kitchen serves as a walkway between two different spaces it could become a very busy room

Kitchen Type: G-shaped

Perfect for:

Families big and small 

Characteristics:

The G-shaped kitchen takes the basic shape of the U and adds an extra peninsula jutting out into the open floor space. This adds a decent amount of surface top space to be used, this peninsula area can accommodate the cooker top or can alternatively be used as a space to entertain. The peninsula gives the feel of a 360-degree kitchen unit with surfaces and work points surrounding. This layout also adds a natural barrier to the kitchen leaving a busy chef in their element, away from interruptions from curious youngster.

Positives:

  • A modern kitchen layout
  • The peninsula creates a barrier to the kitchen
  • The peninsula is perfect for entertaining and cooking simultaneously
  • Lots of surface space for multiple hands to help

Challenges:

  • The G shape demands a decent amount of space to be practical
  • Not particularly practical for table and chairs

Kitchen Type: L-shaped (can accommodate an island)

Perfect for:

Spacious, open plan houses, families of all sizes, couples, individuals

Characteristics:

This has to be one of the most popular forms of kitchen. The proliferation of kitchens as multi-purpose entertainment, relaxation and cooking spaces has seen this style explode. The kitchen area is essentially tucked into a corner of a larger room. It can easily be adapted with the length of each leg a matter of taste, but more importantly space. An extremely welcoming layout that screams out entertaining, it practically invites guests to roll up their sleeves and muddle in. Dependant on space this layout can easily accommodate a table and chairs to host dinner or seat children while meals are prepared. What you gain in openness you lose in worktop space, with less than in the previous U or G-shaped kitchens.

Positives:

  • Perfect for socialising
  • Comfortably accommodates a table and chairs
  • An extremely popular choice for modern, open plan spaces
  • Can easily be scaled up or down in size
  • Can easily accommodate a central island

Challenges:

  • Larger spaces will see a fairly large distance from one end to the other, potentially extending the golden work triangle
  • Limited surface space
  • Can be tricky to keep curious children out

Kitchen Type: U-shaped (can accommodate an island)

Perfect for:

Couples or smaller families

Characteristics:

This is a fairly common layout for kitchens in flats and apartments across the UK. It uses three walls to form a kitchen that wraps around its inhabitant. It is a good layout for groups of young professionals living together as it allows space for multiple cooks to work all at the same time, it also works well for couples and young or small families. It offers a fair amount of surface space and maintains the golden work triangle allowing for easy access from one point to the next. This kitchen can be scaled up and can easily grow depending on the amount of space available. This kitchen type allows for an island that can either sit in the centre of the U or can be used as the fourth wall to complete the four sided shape.

Positives:

  • Fairly spacious
  • Malleable to the space available
  • Can accommodate an island
  • The golden work triangle stays intact

Challenges:

  • Can be tricky accommodating a table and chairs
  • Space in the corners of the U can feel wasted